Zeroing the Scopes

Zeroing the flip up sight and red-dot scopes on my new barbie doll was a pretty easy and definitely fun process.  I set up a target about 35 yards down down that had a little red center.  It took a few round to get it into the center (because i was turning the dial the wrong way) but once it was dialed in, its an extremely accurate weapon here are those initial results

zero-red-dot

You can see that most of the initial shots were to the right of the center.  (I didn’t have to move the front sight post at all, it was zeroed “Out of the box.”  Another reason that I sing the praises of the M and P Sport AR-15).  Once the flip up sight was zeroed, I moved onto the red dot scope.

In zeroing the red dot, I simply adjusted the scope until the red dot sat right on top of the front sight post.  Then, all that one must do, is be sure to place their nose on the charging handle, point that dot where you want the bullet to go, and it goes there.  Nose on the charging handle ensures that the shooters head is in the same spot.  This allows for only one point of reference (the red dot) rather than two, the rear and front sight post.  As long as the nose is on the charging handle, its one of the most accurate weapons I’ve ever fired.  Of course, when I was in the infantry, we only had rear and front sight post period.  So, it being accurate for me may not be much of an expert testimony.  Still, I’m very excited about it.  When the dot is over the front sight post (they call this co-witnessing) and your nose is on the charging handle, it yields fantastic results.  In the picture above, three of the hits on the read are from the red dot, no real zeroing required.  Next, I flipped over the magnifier.

Having already shot up most of the red on that target and being too lazy to switch to another, I used the magnifier on the head of the target as it was clean.  Here are the results, no zeroing required

zero-magnifier

I fired six round at the head, you can see the results above.  This is at a 35 yard target.  So, I decided to test it out on some distance targets.  The farthest distance I can shoot on my little farm, is about 110-120 yards.  I fired the first fifteen round center mass with simply the red dot scope.  Here are the results:

100-yard-target

All fifteen found the mark, five of which strayed to the left and down as I fired those round standing unsupported with holding the foregrip.  Not kill shots, but hits nonetheless.  Next, flipped over the magnifier and fired the next 15 rounds at the head, as it was clean.  Here are those results:

magnifier-and-red-dot-100-yards

Using the magnifier, all fifteen round found the mark on the target.  Fifteen head shots. One shot on kill or 15 out of 15.  Impressive results by any standards.  Ammo for the test was just some cheap stuff that I can buy in bulk, nothing fancy. Additionally, all the optics, magnifier, fore-grip with bi-pod, and flip up sights were purchased from amazon for about 100 bucks.  Making this weapon an easily affordable, fun to shoot, and very accurate hunting and sporting rifle.  Plus, ammo for it is also very reasonable.

I realize that the size of the round matters for some folks.  I agree, I don’t think I would be hunting large game with this round.  However, it is the perfect small game and varmint weapon system.  I would also add, that if I had to use it to hunt larger game, I think it would still be effective.  I’ve never tried it but with 15 head-shots out of 15 rounds, unless the deer is wearing a Kevlar helmet, I think this round would sufficiently put dinner on the table.

 

 

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: